Friday, March 4

Discussion in 'Daily Text' started by Jinnvisible, Feb 27, 2016.

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    Jinnvisible

    Jinnvisible Experienced Member

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    Friday, March 4

    By faith Moses, when grown up,
    refused to be called the son of Pharaoh’s daughter.


    Heb. 11:24.

    Moses’ faith shaped his choice of career. He did not reason that he could serve God as a member of the royal court and then use his wealth and privilege to help his Israelite brothers. Rather, Moses was determined to love Jehovah with all his heart, soul, and strength. (Deut. 6:5) Moses’ decision saved him much heartache. Many of the treasures of Egypt that he gave up were soon plundered—by the Israelites themselves! (Ex. 12:35, 36)

    Pharaoh was humiliated and executed. (Ps. 136:15)


    Conversely, Moses was spared and was used by God to lead an entire nation to safety. His life had real meaning. If you are a young servant of Jehovah, choose a career that will enable you to love Jehovah and serve him “with all your heart and all your soul.” You can be confident that such a course will be “for your own good.”


    Deut. 10:12, 13. w14 4/15 1:6-8
     
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    jehovahisgod

    jehovahisgod Experienced Member

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    It's never going to work to try to serve Jehovah from the inside of the enemy camp.

    Get out of her my people!
     
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    Earthbound

    Earthbound Guest

    Has this board arrived at a general consensus on how to address the rather revisionist discrepancy between Hebrews 11:27 and the account as recorded in Exodus?

    By faith he left Egypt, but not fearing the anger of the king, for he continued steadfast as seeing the One who is invisible. — Hebrews 11:17, NWT

    Moses now got afraid and said: "Surely the thing has become known!" Subsequently Phar'aoh got to hear of this thing, and he attempted to kill Moses; but Moses ran away from Phar'aoh... — Exodus 2:14-15a, NWT

    ~ Earthbound ~
     
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    jehovahisgod

    jehovahisgod Experienced Member

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    I read the scriptures and we are looking at two separate times here mosses killed the Egyptian and fled Egypt and after many years he returned with no fear of the king because of Jehovah'.

    Then he left with isreal leading them across the red sea.
     
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    Utuna

    Utuna Administrator

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    Good question ! I don't remember having broached that subject.

    Please read : "He thought that his brothers would grasp that God was giving them salvation by his hand, but they did not grasp it." - Acts 7:25

    My take here is that Moses knew that he had some kind of a destiny (Acts7:20 ???) with regard to his people. He got afraid and ran away because he was in fear for his life (always better not to tempt fate....) but maybe he also knew that, given said destiny, Jehovah would protect him somehow.

    I'm going to make some research more...
     
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    Utuna

    Utuna Administrator

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    Hebrews 11:27

    11:27. Ex 2:14-15 indicates that Moses was afraid of the king; if this text refers to Moses' first flight from Egypt after slaying the Egyptian, perhaps the writer means a particular kind of fear (i.e., Moses was not afraid enough to deny his people), or perhaps he relativizes that fear by emphasizing Moses' faith in the unseen God (other writers, like Philo and Josephus, minimize or eliminate fear as the cause of Moses' escape). But he may refer to Moses' second departure from Egypt, with Israel following him; verse 28 also speaks of him (singular) keeping the Passover, although it is clear that all Israel kept it. Diaspora Judaism often called God "the Invisible".

    (from IVP Bible Background Commentary: New Testament by
    Craig S. Keener Copyright © 1993 by Craig S. Keener.
    Published by InterVarsity Press. All rights reserved.)
     
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    Utuna

    Utuna Administrator

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    Hebrews 11:27;

    Ver. 27. He forsook Egypt. --

    Moses forsaking Egypt: --

    I. HE FORSOOK EGYPT. Two several times.

    1. When he fled into the land of Midian, where he was a stranger and a shepherd for many years.

    2. When he brought Israel out of Egypt, Whether of these is here intended? Some think the former; some the latter; some both. Yet, whether it be one or both, it is certain both that he did leave Egypt and that he did leave it in this manner. In the former departure he fled to avoid danger: in the latter he marched out like a prince and general with a mighty host.

    (from The Biblical Illustrator Copyright
    © 2002, 2003, 2006 Ages Software, Inc.)
     
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    Utuna

    Utuna Administrator

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    Exodus 2:11-15

    For he acted with evident deliberation. "He looked this way and that way; and when he saw no one, he slew the Egyptian, and hid him in the sand" (v. 12). Through his life at the Egyptian court his own natural inclinations had been formed to rule, and they manifested themselves on this occasion in an ungodly way. This was thrown in his teeth by the man "in the wrong" (haaraashaa', v. 13), who was striving with his brother and doing him an injury: "Who made thee a ruler and judge over us" (v. 14)? and so far he was right. The murder of the Egyptian had also become known; and as soon as Pharaoh heard of it, he sought to kill Moses, who fled into the land of Midian in fear for his life (v. 15). Thus dread of Pharaoh's wrath drove Moses from Egypt into the desert. For all that, it is stated in Heb 11:27, that "by faith (pi'stei) Moses forsook Egypt, not fearing the wrath of the king." This faith, however, he manifested not by fleeing - his flight was rather a sign of timidity - but by leaving Egypt; in other words, by renouncing his position in Egypt, where he might possibly have softened down the kings' wrath, and perhaps even have brought help and deliverance to his brethren the Hebrews. By the fact that he did not allow such human hopes to lead him to remain in Egypt, and was not afraid to increase the king's anger by his flight, he manifested faith in the invisible One as though he saw Him, commending not only himself, but his oppressed nation, to the care and protection of God (vid., Delitzsch on Heb 11:27).

    (from Keil and Delitzsch Commentary on the Old Testament:
    New Updated Edition, Electronic Database. Copyright © 1996
    by Hendrickson Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved.)
     
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    Utuna

    Utuna Administrator

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    Interesting information related to the subject

    Exodus 2:11-25

    It's possible that the Egyptian officer wasn't just disciplining the Jewish slave but was beating him to death, because the Hebrew word can mean that, so when Moses interfered, he was probably saving a man's life. And, if the Egyptian officer turned on Moses, which is likely, then Moses was also defending his own life.

    But if Moses was planning to free the Hebrews by killing the Egyptians one by one, he was in for a shock. The next day he discovered that the Egyptians were only part of the problem because the Jews couldn't even get along with each other! When he tried to reconcile the two Jews, they rejected his help! Even more, he learned that his secret was out and that Pharaoh was after his life. There was only one thing to do and that was to flee.

    These two incidents reveal Moses as a compassionate man who was sincere in his motives but impetuous in his actions. Knowing this, you would never suspect that later he would be called "the meekest man on the earth" (Num 12:3). Moses' failure to help free the Jews must have devastated him. That's why God took him to Midian and made him a shepherd for forty years. He had to learn that deliverance would come from God's hand, not Moses' hand (Acts 7:25; Ex 13:3).

    (from The Bible Exposition Commentary: Old Testament
    © 2001-2004 by Warren W. Wiersbe. All rights reserved.)
     
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