The Bible through Google Earth

Discussion in 'The Universe' started by Utuna, Feb 26, 2013.

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    Utuna

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    Hi T !!!!

    Yes, because of the Intifada, there must be no stones left where the Palestinians live... lol

    I don't think that the professional version has better details either, and all the more so in that region. I guess that the difference between the normal and the Pro version may be just a question of features in the software.

    I guess too that there must be many caves around there that are traditionally considered as tombs of biblical characters. Well, when I don't really know where a very precise place is located on GoogleEarth, I usually start by making a quick research on Google. The problem with such places is that we never really know whether that's the genuine place or just a fable. Well, generally, sacred places are close to or topped by a church so the first thing that we must look for is a church... lol

    Here is what is traditionally considered as the tree of Mamre :

    Abraham's Oak (Oak of Mamre) - 5000 years old, has been dead since 1996

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    Here are too a few pictures found in a quick research about the Patriarch's cave.

    http://www.panoramio.com/photo/24458476
    http://www.panoramio.com/photo/75354...=kh.google.com
     
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    Utuna

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    Hi Jinn !!!

    Well, that front gate is just the symbol of the forgiveness of sins by any person walking through it or something like that.

    Please read :

    "This place on the stair way to the summit of Mount Sinai is called Elijah’s Gate because it’s believed that Prophet Elijah once fled onto this mountain to seek refuge."

    "The area attracts many pilgrims and tourists as it is known as a major sacred site and offers visitors several important religious attractions. At the base of Mt Sinai can be found the fortified Monastery of St Catherine’s which was built by the Roman Emperor Justinian between 527 and 565 A.D. to protect the sacred site where the miracle of the ‘burning bush’ took place. The monastery stands at approximately 1,550 metres and from here it is possible to walk to the summit by way of the 6th century Sikket Sayidna Musa, or the ‘Path of Moses’, which is also known as the ‘Steps of Repentance’. This pathway, which passes through Elijah’s Gate, was carved by a monk from the solid rock of the mountain and consists of 3,750 steps which, on their ascent, pass the ‘Spring of Moses’ and a small Chapel of the Virgin Mary. Further along the pathway and close to the summit, walkers enter a natural amphitheatre known as ‘Elijah’s Hollow’, or the ‘Amphitheatre of the Seven Elders of Israel’, which is where the Prophet Elijah is said to have heard the voice of God after fleeing from Jezebel. Here three Chapels can be found, one to Elijah, one to his acolyte Elisha, and the other to Saint Stephen, it is also possible to see the ancient well used by the Prophet. At the top, which can also be reached via a longer route by camel, visitors can see the Chapel of the Holy Trinity which was re-built by the Greek Orthodox Church in 1934 on top of the ruins of a chapel built in 363 A.D., and a small 12th Mosque."

    Here below is a picture from this website so you can have an idea of the size of the gate :

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    ZAPHON

    ZAPHON zä-fon', za'fon, MOUNT. In Ugaritic literature the term shapanu refers to a specific location, Mt. Casius (Jebel el-'Agra'), about 40 km. (25 mi.) NNE of Râs Sham-rah. It also refers to the cosmic mountain where Baal reigns (cf. Isa 14:13). According to Kapelrud, the tower in a temple dedicated to Baal may have been named Zaphon in order to enhance its sacredness. Since this mountain was in the north, shapanu came to have the secondary meaning of "north." This became the primary meaning of Hebr. shapôn.

    In a few OT texts, however, this term carries its mythopoetic meaning, i.e., the highest mount where God reigns. Thus the NEB renders Ps 89:12 (MT* 13 a), "Thou didst create Zaphon and Amanus" (RSV "The north and the south, thou hast created them"); this means that Yahweh has created even the most distant, ominous places and, therefore, no place lies beyond His rule. In Ps 48:2 (MT* :3) the psalmist lauds Zion as the center of Yahweh's universal reign by comparing it to the utmost heights of Zaphon (see NEB mg., NIV). A few scholars have advocated that shapôn be rendered Zaphon in two other texts: Isa 14:13, which speaks of the highest mountain in the north where the supreme God rules over the assembly, and Job 27:6, which speaks of God spreading out shapôn over chaos.

    (from International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, revised edition,
    Copyright © 1979 by Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co. All rights reserved.)

    *MT= Massoretic Text

    Here are great notes about Mount Zaphon : http://classic.net.bible.org/search.php?search=Zaphon&in=notes

    [TABLE]
    [TR]
    [TD](1.00)[/TD]
    [TD](Isa 14:13)[/TD]
    [TD][SUP]3 [/SUP]sn Zaphon, the Canaanite version of Olympus, was the “mountain of assembly†where the gods met.[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [/TABLE]
    [TABLE]
    [TR]
    [TD](0.62)[/TD]
    [TD](Psa 48:2)[/TD]
    [TD][SUP]3 [/SUP]tn Heb “Mount Zion, the peaks of Zaphon.†Like all the preceding phrases in v. 2, both phrases are appositional to “city of our God, his holy hill†in v. 1, suggesting an identification in the poet’s mind between Mount Zion and Zaphon. “Zaphon†usually refers to the “north†in a general sense (see Pss 89:12; 107:3), but here, where it is collocated with “peaks,†it refers specifically to Mount Zaphon, located in the vicinity of ancient Ugarit and viewed as the mountain where the gods assembled (see Isa 14:13). By alluding to West Semitic mythology in this way, the psalm affirms that Mount Zion is the real divine mountain, for it is here that the Lord God of Israel lives and rules over the nations. See P. Craigie, Psalms 1-50 (WBC), 353, and T. N. D. Mettinger, In Search of God, 103.[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [/TABLE]
    [TABLE]
    [TR]
    [TD](0.38)[/TD]
    [TD](Job 26:7)[/TD]
    [TD][SUP]1 [/SUP]sn The Hebrew word is צָפוֹן (tsafon). Some see here a reference to Mount Zaphon of the Ugaritic texts, the mountain that Baal made his home. The Hebrew writers often equate and contrast Mount Zion with this proud mountain of the north. Of course, the word just means north, and so in addition to any connotations for pagan mythology, it may just represent the northern skies – the stars. Since the parallel line speaks of the earth, that is probably all that was intended in this particular context.[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [/TABLE]
    [TABLE]
    [TR]
    [TD](0.35)[/TD]
    [TD](Isa 14:12)[/TD]
    [TD][SUP]1 [/SUP]sn What is the background for the imagery in vv. 12-15? This whole section (vv. 4b-21) is directed to the king of Babylon, who is clearly depicted as a human ruler. Other kings of the earth address him in vv. 9ff., he is called “the man†in v. 16, and, according to vv. 19-20, he possesses a physical body. Nevertheless the language of vv. 12-15 has led some to see a dual referent in the taunt song. These verses, which appear to be spoken by other pagan kings to a pagan king (cf. vv. 9-11), contain several titles and motifs that resemble those of Canaanite mythology, including references to Helel son of Shachar, the stars of El, the mountain of assembly, the recesses of Zaphon, and the divine title Most High. Apparently these verses allude to a mythological story about a minor god (Helel son of Shachar) who tried to take over Zaphon, the mountain of the gods. His attempted coup failed and he was hurled down to the underworld. The king of Babylon is taunted for having similar unrealized delusions of grandeur. Some Christians have seen an allusion to the fall of Satan here, but this seems contextually unwarranted (see J. Martin, “Isaiah,†BKCOT, 1061).[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [/TABLE]
    [TABLE]
    [TR]
    [TD](0.13)[/TD]
    [TD](Gen 17:1)[/TD]
    [TD][SUP]3 [/SUP]tn The name אֵל שַׁדַּי (’el shadday, “El Shaddaiâ€) has often been translated “God Almighty,†primarily because Jerome translated it omnipotens (“all powerfulâ€) in the Latin Vulgate. There has been much debate over the meaning of the name. For discussion see W. F. Albright, “The Names Shaddai and Abram,†JBL 54 (1935): 173-210; R. Gordis, “The Biblical Root sdy-sd,†JTS 41 (1940): 34-43; and especially T. N. D. Mettinger, In Search of God, 69-72. Shaddai/El Shaddai is the sovereign king of the world who grants, blesses, and judges. In the Book of Genesis he blesses the patriarchs with fertility and promises numerous descendants. Outside Genesis he both blesses/protects and takes away life/happiness. The patriarchs knew God primarily as El Shaddai (Exod 6:3). While the origin and meaning of this name are uncertain (see discussion below) its significance is clear. The name is used in contexts where God appears as the source of fertility and life. In Gen 17:1-8 he appeared to Abram, introduced himself as El Shaddai, and announced his intention to make the patriarch fruitful. In the role of El Shaddai God repeated these words (now elevated to the status of a decree) to Jacob (35:11). Earlier Isaac had pronounced a blessing on Jacob in which he asked El Shaddai to make Jacob fruitful (28:3). Jacob later prayed that his sons would be treated with mercy when they returned to Egypt with Benjamin (43:14). The fertility theme is not as apparent here, though one must remember that Jacob viewed Benjamin as the sole remaining son of the favored and once-barren Rachel (see 29:31; 30:22-24; 35:16-18). It is quite natural that he would appeal to El Shaddai to preserve Benjamin’s life, for it was El Shaddai’s miraculous power which made it possible for Rachel to give him sons in the first place. In 48:3 Jacob, prior to blessing Joseph’s sons, told him how El Shaddai appeared to him at Bethel (see Gen 28) and promised to make him fruitful. When blessing Joseph on his deathbed Jacob referred to Shaddai (we should probably read “El Shaddai,†along with a few Hebrew mss, the Samaritan Pentateuch, the LXX, and Syriac) as the one who provides abundant blessings, including “blessings of the breast and womb†(49:25). (The direct association of the name with “breasts†suggests the name might mean “the one of the breast†[i.e., the one who gives fertility], but the juxtaposition is probably better explained as wordplay. Note the wordplay involving the name and the root שָׁדַד, shadad, “destroyâ€] in Isa 13:6 and in Joel 1:15.) Outside Genesis the name Shaddai (minus the element “El†[“Godâ€]) is normally used when God is viewed as the sovereign king who blesses/protects or curses/brings judgment. The name appears in the introduction to two of Balaam’s oracles (Num 24:4, 16) of blessing upon Israel. Naomi employs the name when accusing the Lord of treating her bitterly by taking the lives of her husband and sons (Ruth 1:20-21). In Ps 68:14; Isa 13:6; and Joel 1:15 Shaddai judges his enemies through warfare, while Ps 91:1 depicts him as the protector of his people. (In Ezek 1:24 and 10:5 the sound of the cherubs’ wings is compared to Shaddai’s powerful voice. The reference may be to the mighty divine warrior’s battle cry which accompanies his angry judgment.) Finally, the name occurs 31 times in the Book of Job. Job and his “friends†assume that Shaddai is the sovereign king of the world (11:7; 37:23a) who is the source of life (33:4b) and is responsible for maintaining justice (8:3; 34:10-12; 37:23b). He provides abundant blessings, including children (22:17-18; 29:4-6), but he can also discipline, punish, and destroy (5:17; 6:4; 21:20; 23:16). It is not surprising to see the name so often in this book, where the theme of God’s justice is primary and even called into question (24:1; 27:2). The most likely proposal is that the name means “God, the one of the mountain†(an Akkadian cognate means “mountain,†to which the Hebrew שַׁד, shad, “breastâ€] is probably related). For a discussion of proposed derivations see T. N. D. Mettinger, In Search of God, 70-71. The name may originally have depicted God as the sovereign judge who, in Canaanite style, ruled from a sacred mountain. Isa 14:13 and Ezek 28:14, 16 associate such a mountain with God, while Ps 48:2 refers to Zion as “Zaphon,†the Canaanite Olympus from which the high god El ruled. (In Isa 14 the Canaanite god El may be in view. Note that Isaiah pictures pagan kings as taunting the king of Babylon, suggesting that pagan mythology may provide the background for the language and imagery.)[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [/TABLE]
    [TABLE]
    [TR]
    [TD](0.13)[/TD]
    [TD](Isa 13:6)[/TD]
    [TD][SUP]2 [/SUP]sn The divine name used here is שַׁדַּי (shaddai, “Shaddaiâ€). Shaddai (or El Shaddai) is the sovereign king/judge of the world who grants life/blesses and kills/judges. In Genesis he blesses the patriarchs with fertility and promises numerous descendants. Outside Genesis he both blesses/protects and takes away life/happiness. The patriarchs knew God primarily as El Shaddai (Exod 6:3). While the origin and meaning of this name is uncertain (see discussion below) its significance is clear. The name is used in contexts where God appears as the source of fertility and life. In Gen 17:1-8 he appears to Abram, introduces himself as El Shaddai, and announces his intention to make the patriarch fruitful. In the role of El Shaddai God repeats these words (now elevated to the status of a decree) to Jacob (35:11). Earlier Isaac had pronounced a blessing upon Jacob in which he asked El Shaddai to make Jacob fruitful (28:3). Jacob later prays that his sons will be treated with mercy when they return to Egypt with Benjamin (43:14). The fertility theme is not as apparent here, though one must remember that Jacob viewed Benjamin as the sole remaining son of the favored and once-barren Rachel (cf. 29:31; 30:22-24; 35:16-18). It is quite natural that he would appeal to El Shaddai to preserve Benjamin’s life, for it was El Shaddai’s miraculous power which made it possible for Rachel to give him sons in the first place. In 48:3 Jacob, prior to blessing Joseph’s sons, tells him how El Shaddai appeared to him at Bethel (cf. chapter 28) and promised to make him fruitful. When blessing Joseph on his deathbed Jacob refers to Shaddai (we should probably read “El Shaddai,†along with a few Hebrew mss, the Samaritan Pentateuch, LXX, and Syriac) as the one who provides abundant blessings, including “blessings of the breast and womb†(49:25). (The direct association of the name with שָׁדַיִם [shadayim, “breastsâ€] suggests the name might mean “the one of the breast†[i.e., the one who gives fertility], but the juxtaposition is probably better explained as wordplay. Note the wordplay involving the name and the root שָׁדַד [shadad, “destroyâ€] here in Isa 13:6 and in Joel 1:15.) Outside Genesis the name Shaddai (minus El, “Godâ€) is normally used when God is viewed as the sovereign king who blesses/protects or curses/brings judgment. The name appears in the introduction to two of Balaam’s oracles (Num 24:4, 16) of blessing upon Israel. Naomi employs the name when accusing the Lord of treating her bitterly by taking the lives of her husband and sons (Ruth 1:20-21). In Ps 68:14; Isa 13:6; and Joel 1:15 Shaddai judges his enemies through warfare, while Ps 91:1 depicts him as the protector of his people. (In Ezek 1:24 and 10:5 the sound of the cherubs’ wings is compared to Shaddai’s powerful voice. The reference may be to the mighty divine warrior’s battle cry which accompanies his angry judgment.) Last but not least, the name occurs 31 times in the Book of Job. Job and his “friends†assume that Shaddai is the sovereign king of the world (11:7; 37:23a) who is the source of life (33:4b) and is responsible for maintaining justice (8:3; 34:10-12; 37:23b). He provides abundant blessings, including children (22:17-18; 29:4-6), but can also discipline, punish, and destroy (5:17; 6:4; 21:20; 23:16). It is not surprising to see the name so often in this book, where the theme of God’s justice is primary and even called into question (24:1; 27:2). The most likely proposal is that the name means “God, the one of the mountain†(an Akkadian cognate means “mountain,†to which Heb. שַׁד [shad, “breastâ€] is probably related). For a discussion of proposed derivations see T. N. D. Mettinger, In Search of God, 70-71. The name may originally depict God as the sovereign judge who, in Canaanite style, rules from a sacred mountain. Isa 14:13 and Ezek 28:14, 16 associate such a mountain with God, while Ps 48:2 refers to Zion as “Zaphon,†the Canaanite Olympus from which the high god El ruled. (In Isa 14 the Canaanite god El may be in view. Note that Isaiah pictures pagan kings as taunting the king of Babylon, suggesting that pagan mythology may provide the background for the language and imagery.)[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [/TABLE]

    Ugarit

    https://maps.google.com/?q=35.6019269,35.783109

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    Utuna

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    Mount Zaphon (aka Mount Aqraa)

    https://maps.google.com/?q=35.952912,35.969887

    [​IMG]

    About the same as seen from a plane.

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    The same, as seen from the Turkish side.

    [​IMG]

    BAAL-ZEPHON

    BAAL-ZEPHON bal-ze'fon [Hebr. ba'al shepôn — 'lord of the north']. A place along the route of the Exodus used to locate Pi-hahiroth (which was "in front of Baal-zephon," Ex 14:2,9, or "east of Baal-zephon," Num 33:7; the encampment is further described as "between Migdol and the sea"). The location of Baal-zephon has become central to the discussion of the route of the EXODUS .

    Since the publication by O. Eissfeldt of his Baal Zaphon, Zeus Kasios and der Durchzug der Israeliten durchs Meer (1932), many scholars have adopted the view that the Israelites proceeded directly from Egypt toward Canaan by the shortest route, viz., along the Mediterranean. The account of the journey in the wilderness and to Sinai is, for any who hold this view, an intrusion into the original story for obvious theological purposes.

    Baal-zephon, it is now clear, was a god associated with the sea and maritime commerce, and his name associates him with the north. In the Râs Shamrah texts, shpn is generally identified with Mt. Casius, N of Ugarit alongside the mouth of the Orontes. It seems logical to assume that a site to the north in Egypt would be chosen for worship of the same deity, and this is supported by a Phoenician papyrus that associates Baal-zephon with the Egyptian port of Tahpanhes (Tell Defneh). On the other hand, it is also clear that Zeus Casios, whom Eissfeldt identifies as Baal-zephon, was worshiped at several places in Egypt, not all of them on the northern boundary, including Tahpanhes and Memphis.

    If we accept the biblical record of the stages of the Exodus journey as authentic, we note that the Israelites started out to worship Yahweh at the mountain of Moses' revelation experience, that they proceeded to Etham on the edge of the desert (Ex 13:20; Num 33:6), then turned back (Ex 14:2; Num 33:7) to Pi-hahiroth E of Baal-zephon, where Pharaoh's hosts overtook them (Ex 14:9). The miraculous deliverance through the parted waters of the "Sea of Reeds," or "Red Sea," occurred there. In Hebrew "Sea of Reeds" can refer both to the Red Sea and to the Gulf of Aqabah; the Greek term is even more vague, referring to the Red Sea, the Arabian Sea, and the Persian Gulf. But in any event, neither term is applied to the Mediterranean Sea or any of its arms. It seems, then, that if we are to handle the biblical text — not to mention the long and unbroken tradition that stems from it — as definitive, we must locate Baal-zephon somewhere between the eastern Delta and the Wilderness of Sinai, possibly in the region of the Bitter Lakes, somewhat to the north of the route from which the Israelites had to turn back.

    (from International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, revised edition, Copyright
    © 1979 by Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co. All rights reserved.)

    Wikipedia link to Mount Aqraa = http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Aqraa

    Baal-Zephon = Baal = Hadad (thunder god)

    HADAD

    5. An alternative name for Baal, the head of the Canaanite pantheon, whose worship was expressed in fertility rites. (See BAAL I: UGARIT .) The storm-god Hadad is mentioned in Assyrian inscriptions, and called on the monolith of Shalmaneser "the god of Aleppo." In the Assyrian inscriptions he is identified with the air-god Rimmon. The union of the two names in Zech 12:11 suggests this identity.

    (from International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, revised edition, Copyright
    © 1979 by Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co. All rights reserved.)

     
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    Ishtar's Gate.

    "The king was answering and saying: “Is not this Babylon the Great, that I myself have built for the royal house with the strength of my might and for the dignity of my majesty?â€￾" - Daniel 4:30

    Everytime I see such very old stones like these, I tell to myself : "Wow, men made of flesh and bones like me had them in their hands thousands of years ago... and even the faithful prophet Daniel laid his eyes on them... admired their beauty, their color, their grandeur, maybe closed his eyes whilst feeling a warm breeze on his forefront, breathed in deeply, smelled the fragrant scents of the spices, of the resin of the trees and of the humid soil around him and then moved on.... and one day, they'll all be back to life !"

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    Source :

    Ishtar Gate

    The Ishtar Gate was constructed by the Babylonian King Nebuchadnezzar II circa 575 BCE. It was the eighth gate of the city of Babylon (in present day Iraq) and was the main entrance into the city. The Ishtar Gate was part of Nebuchadnezzar's plan to beautify his empire's capital and during the first half of the 6th century BCE, he also restored the temple of Marduk and built the renowned wonder: the Hanging Gardens as part of this plan. The magnificence of the Ishtar Gate was so well known that it made the initial list of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. However, it was later replaced by the Lighthouse of Alexandria, but some authors (Antipater of Sidon and Calliamchus of Cyrene) wrote that the "Gates of Ishtar" and "Walls of Babylon" should still be considered one of the wonders.

    The Ishtar Gate and Deities

    The Ishtar Gate is named so, because it was dedicated to the Babylonian goddess Ishtar, although Nebuchadnezzar pays homage to other Babylonian deities through various animal representations. The animals represented on the gate are young bulls (aurochs), lions, and dragons (sirrush). These animals are symbolic representations of certain deities: lions are often associated with Ishtar, bulls with Adad, and dragons with Marduk. Respectively, Ishtar was a goddess of fertility, love, war, and sex, Adad was a weather god, and Marduk was the chief or national god of Babylon.

    Materials & Construction

    The front of the gate is adorned with glazed bricks with alternating rows of dragons and bulls. The beasts are furnished in yellow and brown tiles, while the bricks surrounding them are blue. The blue enameled tiles are thought to be of lapis lazuli, but there is some debate to this conjecture. The gates measured more than 38 feet (11.5 m) high with a vast antechamber on the southern side.

    Through the gatehouse is the Processional Way, which is a brick-paved corridor over half a mile long with walls over 50 feet tall (15.2 m) on each side. The walls are adorned with over 120 sculptural lions, flowers, and enameled yellow tiles. The Processional Way was used for the New Year's celebration, through which statues of the deities would parade down and the path paved with red and yellow stones (rows of red stone on the outer layers and a yellow row in-between). Each one of these stones has an inscription underneath: a small prayer from King Nebuchadnezzar to the chief god Marduk. It was this processional way that led to the temple of Marduk.

    Dedication Plaque

    On the Ishtar Gate, there is a dedication plaque written from Nebuchadnezzar's point of view that explains the gate's purpose and describes it in some detail.

    Nebuchadnezzar, King of Babylon, the faithful prince appointed by the will of Marduk, the highest of princely princes, beloved of Nabu, of prudent counsel, who has learned to embrace wisdom, who fathomed their divine being and reveres their majesty, the untiring governor, who always takes to heart the care of the cult of Esagila and Ezida and is constantly concerned with the well-being of Babylon and Borsippa, the wise, the humble, the caretaker of Esagila and Ezida, the firstborn son of Nabopolassar, the King of Babylon.

    Both gate entrances of Imgur-Ellil and Nemetti-Ellil following the filling of the street from Babylon had become increasingly lower.

    Therefore, I pulled down these gates and laid their foundations at the water table with asphalt and bricks and had them made of bricks with blue stone on which wonderful bulls and dragons were depicted.

    I covered their roofs by laying majestic cedars length-wise over them. I hung doors of cedar adorned with bronze at all the gate openings.

    I placed wild bulls and ferocious dragons in the gateways and thus adorned them with luxurious splendor so that people might gaze on them in wonder.

    I let the temple of Esiskursiskur (the highest festival house of Marduk, the Lord of the Gods a place of joy and celebration for the major and minor gods) be built firm like a mountain in the precinct of Babylon of asphalt and fired bricks.



    Excavation & Reconstruction

    The Ishtar gate was excavated between 1902 to 1914 CE during which 45 feet (13.7 m) of the original foundation of the gate was discovered. The material excavated by Robert Koldewey was used in a reconstruction of the Ishtar Gate and the Processional Way. In 1930 CE, the reconstruction was finished at the Pergamon Museum in Berlin, Germany.

    Due to size restrictions at the Pergamon Museum, the Ishtar Gate is neither complete nor its original size. The gate was originally a double gate, but the Pergamon Museum only utilizes the smaller, frontal part. The second gate is currently in storage. Originally, the gate had a door and roof made of cedar and bronze, which was not built for the reconstruction. A smaller reconstruction of the Ishtar Gate was built in Iraq under Saddam Hussein as the entrance to a museum. However, this reconstruction was never finished due to war.

    There are several museums in the world that have received portions of the Ishtar Gate: the Istanbul Archaeology Museum, the Detroit Institute of Art, the Royal Ontario Museum, the Louvre, Munich's State Museum of Egyptian Art, New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Oriental Institute of Chicago, and many others.
     
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    The lion of Babylon

    Source

    The Lion of Babylon, large and splendidly carved in basalt, reminds us again that the lion was the symbol of the goddess Ishtar. In the sculpture, the lion's back has marks indicating that it was meant for a precious saddle upon which the goddess Ishtar would stand.

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    [video=youtube;h2qy2wrwY-Q]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h2qy2wrwY-Q[/video]
     
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    Poetry of Providence

    Poetry of Providence Active Member

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    hummmm looks like a man is pinned under that Lion .
    That appears a little more than symbolic to me .
     
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    Utuna

    Utuna Administrator

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    Utuna

    Utuna Administrator

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    Walls at the upper left angle of the city

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    Utuna

    Utuna Administrator

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    The Mashki Gate

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    Utuna

    Utuna Administrator

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    The Nergal Gate

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    Poetry of Providence

    Poetry of Providence Active Member

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    absolutely stunning ...I have over on my youtube Channel a series of
    documentaries , the best thing about them is the Photography of ruins
    and architecture and the phenomenal feats of just building them ..
    (as I no longer own a TV but only this contraption I found that I have
    much more viewing "pleasure" as I had to pay for the highest tier just
    to get the learning/educational channels) only to find they are nearly
    all free on Youtube ..yes those "educators" want you to have access
    to their films without the cost of supplying them to the syndicated
    channels ownership and fees ...(ok this works just as well for those
    educators who wish to annihilate religion/truth)
     
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    wallflower

    wallflower Moderator

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    Thanks for sharing the pics, Utuna. Yeah....that did make my hair curl. :)
     

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